Virginia Assembly Passes Stricter Voter ID Laws | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : Morning Edition

Virginia Assembly Passes Stricter Voter ID Laws

Play associated audio

Virginia voters would no longer be able to present certain forms of identification at the polls under legislation that has passed both houses of the General Assembly. The bills take slightly different forms, and one is subject to General Assembly funding for voter education and outreach.

Both bills eliminate government checks, pay stubs, Social Security cards, utility bills, and bank statements as forms of identification that can be used at the polls. Voter ID cards, concealed-carry permits, driver's licenses, and student IDs could still be used.

Del. Jennifer McClellan (D-Richmond) said many poor senior citizens don't have those remaining forms.

"They don't drive anymore. They don't have a valid driver's license," McClellan says. "They don't have a concealed weapons permit. They're retired, so they don't have an employer ID. They're not students."

Delegate Mark Cole defended his bill.

"This bill just cleans up the list of items that are very weak forms of ID," Cole said. "Every person who registers to vote gets a voter registration card."

Lt. Governor Bill Bolling's (R) tie-breaking vote helped Democrats amend the Senate bill to require voter outreach funding to take effect and delays the effective date to next year. The Senate later passed a photo ID requirement that also added passports. This bill directs the state to provide free voter registration cards with photos for people without other forms of ID.

NPR

From Bond Girl To Medicine Woman: Jane Seymour's Big Break

The actress is best known for her role as Dr. Quinn, the physician on the American frontier. But her big break came years before, when she played 007's tarot-reading love interest in Live and Let Die.
NPR

'Into The Wild' Author Tries Science To Solve Toxic Seed Mystery

Jon Krakauer has long been haunted by how Christopher McCandless died in the Alaskan wilderness. In a scientific journal, he and a chemist show that the seeds McCandless consumed can contain a toxin.
NPR

5 Things You Should Know About Ben Carson

The pediatric neurosurgeon performed pioneering operations on conjoined twins and has never held public office before. Here's what else you might not know.
NPR

A Poker Battle Against A Computer

On this day in 1997, Boris Kasparov, the world's top chess player, faced off against IBM's chess-playing supercomputer, Deep Blue — and lost. This week, professional poker players are trying something similar in Pittsburgh, and they're winning.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.