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Gray Focuses On Affordable Housing In State Of The District

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D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray promised a major investment in affordable housing during his State of the District address Tuesday. The address, his third since taking office, which was held last night at the Sixth & I historic synagogue in downtown D.C.

In an hour-long speech that leaned heavily on baseball metaphors, Gray touted the successes of his administration: the growing population, the lowest homicide rate in more than 50 years, and a booming economy that has led to record surpluses. With that extra cash, Gray said, the District has a unique opportunity to re-invest the money back into the city.

"We once worried about the District becoming a city of  haves and  have-nots," he said. "But now we are increasingly in danger of becoming a city of only  haves."

To make sure "everyone benefits from D.C.'s prosperity," Gray proposed a $100 million plan to expand affordable housing in D.C. He also called for a pay increase for city government employees, including the police and firefighters.

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