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Man Brings Rifle Into Grocery Store In Gun Rights Demonstration

Communities may be taking a closer look at gun control laws after a frightening incident in Charlottesville, Va. when a man walked into a grocery store with a loaded, semi-automatic rifle.

Customers at were alarmed Sunday evening to see a 22-year-old man strolling through a Kroger store with the weapon. Many raced outside, and several called 911, but when officers arrived, they did not arrest the man because he wasn't violating any law.

Still, Charlottesville police were none too happy.

"What was the necessity of carrying it in there and alarming mothers, fathers and their children," says Charlottesville Police Lt. Ronnie Roberts. "And it alarmed us. It alarms law enforcement."

The man was cooperative and police quickly determined his motive. The man was carrying a note on him that indicated he was exercising his First and Second Amendment rights, Roberts says.

"Our position would be there's better ways to exercise your rights other than to do something of that sort," he says.

The police department will explore ways to prevent future problems of that kind, Roberts says. The Kroger store, which banned the man from the premises, may post warnings to future protestors.

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