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Man Brings Rifle Into Grocery Store In Gun Rights Demonstration

Communities may be taking a closer look at gun control laws after a frightening incident in Charlottesville, Va. when a man walked into a grocery store with a loaded, semi-automatic rifle.

Customers at were alarmed Sunday evening to see a 22-year-old man strolling through a Kroger store with the weapon. Many raced outside, and several called 911, but when officers arrived, they did not arrest the man because he wasn't violating any law.

Still, Charlottesville police were none too happy.

"What was the necessity of carrying it in there and alarming mothers, fathers and their children," says Charlottesville Police Lt. Ronnie Roberts. "And it alarmed us. It alarms law enforcement."

The man was cooperative and police quickly determined his motive. The man was carrying a note on him that indicated he was exercising his First and Second Amendment rights, Roberts says.

"Our position would be there's better ways to exercise your rights other than to do something of that sort," he says.

The police department will explore ways to prevent future problems of that kind, Roberts says. The Kroger store, which banned the man from the premises, may post warnings to future protestors.

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ESPN contributor Kevin Blackistone, Bloomberg View's Kavitha Davidson and The Washington Post's Wesley Lowery talk about the UofL basketball team, public opinion of the NFL, and women in sports.
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After Introducing Changes, Keurig Sales Continue To Fall

Despite America's high coffee consumption, Keurig reported disappointing sales this week. Even during its popular holiday selling period, the numbers haven't perked up in recent years.
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It was the last debate before the New Hampshire primary and Donald Trump was back onstage. Which GOP candidate ended up with the most talking time?
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How Limited Internet Access Can Subtract From Kids' Education

Smartphones are often credited with helping bridge the "digital divide" between people who do and don't have Internet access at home. But is mobile Internet enough for a family with a kid in school?

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