WAMU 88.5 : Morning Edition

Filed Under:

Man Brings Rifle Into Grocery Store In Gun Rights Demonstration

Communities may be taking a closer look at gun control laws after a frightening incident in Charlottesville, Va. when a man walked into a grocery store with a loaded, semi-automatic rifle.

Customers at were alarmed Sunday evening to see a 22-year-old man strolling through a Kroger store with the weapon. Many raced outside, and several called 911, but when officers arrived, they did not arrest the man because he wasn't violating any law.

Still, Charlottesville police were none too happy.

"What was the necessity of carrying it in there and alarming mothers, fathers and their children," says Charlottesville Police Lt. Ronnie Roberts. "And it alarmed us. It alarms law enforcement."

The man was cooperative and police quickly determined his motive. The man was carrying a note on him that indicated he was exercising his First and Second Amendment rights, Roberts says.

"Our position would be there's better ways to exercise your rights other than to do something of that sort," he says.

The police department will explore ways to prevent future problems of that kind, Roberts says. The Kroger store, which banned the man from the premises, may post warnings to future protestors.

WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, April 24

You can see a creative dance group perform a physical ode to the natural world or check out an indie-soul singer who uses music to pay tribute to her roots.
NPR

Obama Gets A Taste Of Jiro's 'Dream' Sushi In Name Of Diplomacy

On the first leg of his Asian tour, the president stopped by the iconic sushi restaurant. David Gelb, who directed a documentary about the restaurant, says eating there is amazing and nerve-wracking.
WAMU 88.5

Environmentalists Turn To Campaign Finance Reform To Advance Cause

Frustrated by the lobbying power of oil and gas companies, environmenalists are joining the call for campaign finance reform in Washington.

NPR

FCC Set To Change Net Neutrality Rules

On Thursday, the chairman of the Federal Communications Commission will propose new rules for how broadband providers should treat the Internet traffic flowing through their networks.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.