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Cleanup Crews Brave Chilly Temps After Inauguration

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A crew lifts the protective barrier put down to shield the lawn on the National Mall during inauguration.
Armando Trull
A crew lifts the protective barrier put down to shield the lawn on the National Mall during inauguration.

Hundreds of crews spent the overnight and an early morning hours cleaning up the mess and materials from yesterday's inauguration.

This morning, on the National Mall between the Washington Monument and the U.S. Capitol, dozens of workers were busy picking up interlocking segments of the huge plastic mat that was laid down to protect the lawn. 

The crew has 8,000 segments to pick up. 

"We unlock the floor with the metal t-bar, and we have 8,000 panels to pick up today and tomorrow," said Justin, who was one of the crew members. "It's going to be a little colder tomorrow but the wind chill is making it pretty cold out here today." 

This is just part of the cleanup effort around the city today. Pennsylvania Avenue — which served as the inaugural parade route — has already been cleared of its barriers and not even a speck of trash is visible on the mall as the District gets back to its normal routine after the 57th inaugural.

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