WAMU 88.5 : Morning Edition

D.C. Uses Reviewing Stand As Voting Rights Pulpit

Play associated audio
D.C. will try to use the inauguration as an opportunity to push for greater rights for the District.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/poldavo/541736624/
D.C. will try to use the inauguration as an opportunity to push for greater rights for the District.

Leaders in the District plan to call attention to D.C.'s lack of autonomy during today's inauguration parade.

Through license plates and a large sign outside city hall, District leaders are hoping to rally support and awareness for D.C.'s lack of budget autonomy and voting rights in Congress. On the viewing stand at the Wilson Building where the mayor and other city leaders will be watching today's parade, a blue sign reads, "A More Perfect Union Must Include Full Democracy in D.C."

In one small victory for the District, just last week White House officials announced after meeting with several council that presidential vehicles will now carry the "taxation without representation" license plate. That means the symbolic tags will be on display later today as hundreds of thousands, perhaps millions, of people watch the parade along Pennsylvania Avenue either in person or on TV.

NPR

Woody Allen's 'Fading Gigolo' Full Of Loneliness And Longing

In the new comedy Fading Gigolo, John Turturro plays the title character, and Woody Allen plays his pimp. This story originally broadcast on All Things Considered on April 18, 2014.
NPR

Soup to Nuts, Restaurants Smoke It All

While you won't find cigarettes in restaurants anymore, some smoking isn't banned. It's not just meat, either; it's hot to smoke just about anything edible.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Remains At Odds With Feds On Medicaid Expansion

Lawmakers in Virginia continue to resist the $9.6 billion Medicaid expansion on offer from the federal government as part of the Affordable Care Act.

NPR

Watch For The Blind Lets You Feel Time Passing

A new watch allows the blind to feel time on their wrists. Designer Hyungsoo Kim tells NPR's Wade Goodwyn his watch allows users to tell time accurately without revealing their disabilities.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.