D.C. Uses Reviewing Stand As Voting Rights Pulpit | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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D.C. Uses Reviewing Stand As Voting Rights Pulpit

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D.C. will try to use the inauguration as an opportunity to push for greater rights for the District.
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D.C. will try to use the inauguration as an opportunity to push for greater rights for the District.

Leaders in the District plan to call attention to D.C.'s lack of autonomy during today's inauguration parade.

Through license plates and a large sign outside city hall, District leaders are hoping to rally support and awareness for D.C.'s lack of budget autonomy and voting rights in Congress. On the viewing stand at the Wilson Building where the mayor and other city leaders will be watching today's parade, a blue sign reads, "A More Perfect Union Must Include Full Democracy in D.C."

In one small victory for the District, just last week White House officials announced after meeting with several council that presidential vehicles will now carry the "taxation without representation" license plate. That means the symbolic tags will be on display later today as hundreds of thousands, perhaps millions, of people watch the parade along Pennsylvania Avenue either in person or on TV.

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