More Reports Of Nepotism, No-Bid Contracts At MWAA | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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More Reports Of Nepotism, No-Bid Contracts At MWAA

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More details are surfacing this morning about nepotism and no bid contracts at the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority.

At least 10 percent of those working at the MWAA have relatives who also work there, according to an investigation by the Washington Post. A total of 150 of the 1,400 workers are linked by either blood or marriage, the post reported.

The report also cites a cozy $800,000 no-bid contract awarded by a former vice president to a friend's company. That company then hired the former vice president's daughter and wife to work on the contract paying them $175,000.

These are the latest revelations in a long list of ethical lapses uncovered by several audits. The authority has been widely criticized by federal, state and local officials. The U.S. Department of Transportation on Tuesday assigned an internal watchdog to look into ethics at the authority.

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