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D.C. Fire Department Developing New Sick Leave Policy

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D.C. Fire and EMS may implement a new sick leave policy after dozens of firefighters and other emergency responders called out sick on New Year's Eve. 
Markette Smith
D.C. Fire and EMS may implement a new sick leave policy after dozens of firefighters and other emergency responders called out sick on New Year's Eve. 

D.C. Fire and EMS is reexamining its sick leave policy for firefighters and other emergency responders after dozens of city firefighters called out sick on New Year's Eve. No changes will be implemented before the inauguration, says D.C. Fire spokesman Lon Walls. 

Durand Ford says his father died while he was waiting more than 40 minutes for an ambulance to arrive on the same night that dozens of city firefighters called out sick, according to NBC Washington.

Ford's father went into cardiac arrest in the early morning of New Year's Day, and his family called 911 around 1 a.m. At 1:47 a.m., D.C. Fire and EMS asked Prince George's County for assistance, and an ambulance was sent to Ford's father from Oxon Hill, Md., seven miles away, NBC reports.

Around 90 District of Columbia firefighters called out sick on New Year's Eve. The firefighters' union has denied there was a coordinated sick-out. 

D.C. Council member Tommy Wells has criticized firefighters and the union for putting public safety at risk. 

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