Culpeper Man Sues Sheriff After His Murder Conviction Is Overturned | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Culpeper Man Sues Sheriff After His Murder Conviction Is Overturned

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A man whose capital murder conviction was overturned is suing the Culpeper County sheriff, four other officers, a former prosecutor and an informant, according to the Associated Press.

Michael Hash of Culpeper reportedly filed the lawsuit in late December in U.S. District Court in Charlottesville. The lawsuit claims the defendants engaged in a concerted effort to convict Hash even though there was not any credible evidence against him.

Hash served 12 years of a life sentence before U.S. District Judge James Turk overturned his conviction in February 2012. Turk cited police and prosecutorial misconduct and in August approved a special prosecutor's motion to drop the case.

Hash was 15 at the time of the slaying of 74-year-old Thelma Scroggins, who was shot in her home. He was convicted in 2001.

His lawsuit seeks unspecified compensatory and punitive damages for false arrest, malicious prosecution, false imprisonment, suppression and fabrication of evidence and conspiracy to violate his rights.

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