Rep. Delaney To Focus On U.S. Competitiveness In 1st Term | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Rep. Delaney To Focus On U.S. Competitiveness In 1st Term

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Maryland's newest congressman says restoring U.S. competitiveness is his top priority as he takes office, the Associated Press reports.

Rep. John Delaney (D-Md.) was sworn in Thursday, ending 20 years of Republican representation in the state's 6th Congressional District. 

Delaney sees the tax package Congress passed this week as creating continued uncertainty about the federal deficit and debt reduction. And that's bad for business, he told the AP after being sworn in.

Delaney favors a combination of spending cuts and tax increases. He also advocates lower corporate taxes and the elimination of certain deductions and loopholes. He also believes Medicare should be tweaked to make it more efficient. 

The Potomac banker defeated 10-term incumbent Roscoe Bartlett in November. Delaney scored the victory after Maryland's ruling Democrats redrew the district's boundaries to make it more competitive.

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