WAMU 88.5 : Morning Edition

Filed Under:

Maryland Del. Wants More Regulation For WSSC

Play associated audio

When the Maryland General Assembly convenes next week, a package of bills regarding the Washington Suburban Sanitation Commission will be awaiting lawmakers.

Del. Tom Hucker (D-Montgomery County) has pre-filed four bills regarding the utility that provides water to both Prince George's and Montgomery Counties. One makes the WSSC test for chemicals that are not covered by federal environmental laws passed in the 1990s.

"28 chemicals and two viruses. These are industrial chemicals that are carcinogens, some hormones, and some viruses that are more widely seen than in the past," Hucker explains.

Among the chemicals that Hucker wants water tested for is PFOA, which was used in a lot of non-stick cookware. The other bills would make the WSSC post all sewage leaks that occur in its system on the commission's website, as well as in public places like parks where waterways like creeks and streams could be affected. 

The measures are not a sign of displeasure with WSSC, says Hucker. "I think generally people are happy, but there are concerns out there," he says.

Montgomery County lawmakers have pre-filed more than 20 bills before session starts on Jan. 9.

NPR

Smithsonian Sets Phasers To Restore On Original Starship Enterprise

The Starship Enterprise — from the original Star Trek series — has gotten a restoration fit for a real life spacecraft. It goes on display this week at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum.
NPR

Click For Fewer Calories: Health Labels May Change Online Ordering Habits

Will it be a hamburger or hummus wrap for lunch? When customers saw indications of a meal's calorie content posted online, they put fewer calories in their cart, a study finds.
WAMU 88.5

Jonathan Rauch On How American Politics Went Insane

Party insiders and backroom deals: One author on why we need to bring back old-time politics.

WAMU 88.5

Episode 5: Why 1986 Still Matters

In 1986, a federal official issued a warning: If Metro continued to expand rapidly, the system faced a future of stark choices over maintaining existing infrastructure. Metro chose expansion. We talk to a historian about that decision. We also hear from a former Metro general manager about the following years, and from an Arlington planner about measuring how riders are responding to SafeTrack.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.