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Grosso Sworn In As D.C. Council Member

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David Grosso took his seat at the D.C. Council dais Wednesday.
Courtesy of David Grosso
David Grosso took his seat at the D.C. Council dais Wednesday.

Six incoming members were sworn into the D.C. Council Wednesday, including newcomer David Grosso — the independent candidate who defeated incumbent Michael A. brown in November for the at-large seat reserved for non-Democrats.

Grosso is an attorney and former staff member for D.C. Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, a Democrat who represents the District of Columbia in Congress. In his speech, he called for a "new day in D.C. politics." He told his colleagues in the crowd that it's important for lawmakers to remember voters more than donors.

The incoming council member's top priorities will be D.C. Public Schools and ethics reform, he told WAMU 88.5 in November. During his campaign, he accused Brown of being unfit to serve because of a string of personal financial problems. 

Five incumbent council members were also sworn in to new terms Wednesday: Yvette Alexander, Marion Barry, Muriel Bowser, Jack Evans and Vincent Orange.

They talked about the city's highlights, including a low homicide rate and the success of D.C.'s sports teams.

Indeed, it seemed any mention of Robert Griffith III earned hearty applause. Lawmakers also spoke about the upcoming challenges, including improving the school system and achieving more autonomy from Congress.

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