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Sentencing Date Not Set For Former Gray Campaign Aide

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A judge has agreed not to set a sentencing date for a former campaign aide to D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray.

Thomas Gore, an assistant treasurer to Gray's 2010 campaign against then-mayor Adrian Fenty, pleaded guilty in May to making straw donations to Sulaimon Brown's campaign and then destroying evidence of the payments. Gore admitted he destroyed a spiral notebook containing records of the payments to Brown  and later lied to FBI agents about the notebook.

Gore is one of three Gray campaign aides who have pleaded guilty to felonies. The investigation has revealed that Gray's victory was aided by $650,000 in illicit funds.

During a court appearance Wednesday, prosecutors asked a judge not to set a sentencing date because their investigation remains active and Gore is cooperating, which could lead to his sentence being reduced.

Sentencing guidelines call for Gore to receive between 12 and 18 months in prison.

Gore's attorney, Frederick Cooke, says he's frustrated by the delays because his client needs closure.


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