D.C. Unveils Citywide Cab Color Options | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : Morning Edition

Filed Under:

D.C. Unveils Citywide Cab Color Options

Play associated audio
Just one of the four proposed color schemes for D.C. taxis.
Martin Di Caro
Just one of the four proposed color schemes for D.C. taxis.

D.C. area residents will get their first look at the possible colors for the city's taxicabs. The city is proposing a uniform color scheme for the city's taxi fleets, and residents will get to choose which colors they like best.

D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray rolled out four of the possible color schemes — red/white, red/black, yellow/green and yellow/white — Monday at Verizon Center. The four cabs will remain on display there and residents will be able to vote for their favorite.

Unlike New York City's taxis that are all solid yellow, the options that'll be considered in D.C. are multi-color patterns of yellow and green, red and gold, or burgundy red and black.

After Gray unveiled them at a news conference inside the Verizon Center, he was asked how those colors were picked. "I don't know, just a group decision to say let's do something really funky," he laughs. "It's pretty distinctive, don't you think?"

Cabs in the District currently run the gamut, color-wise. The uniform scheme was part of a broad package of reforms approved this year. Credit card readers and GPS devices will also be required in all cabs as part of the reforms.

Those with strong opinions will also be able to vote on the D.C. Taxicab Commission's website, where other color options will also be displayed, as well as on Twitter, using the hashtag #voteDCTaxi. People can also vote in person at Verizon Center through Jan. 7.

Next year, the District's taxicab commission will take the public's choice into consideration when making a final decision. A new color scheme will be phased in over time, as cabbies will be required to adopt it when they replace their aging taxis, a process that will take several years.

NPR

If Robots 'Speak,' Will We Listen? Novel Imagines A Future Changed By AI

As artificial intelligence alters human connection, Louisa Hall's characters wrestle with whether machines can truly feel. Some "feel they have to stand up for a robot's right to exist," Hall says.
NPR

Aphrodisiacs Can Spark Sexual Imagination, But Probably Not Libido

Going on a picnic with someone special? Make sure to pack watermelon, a food that lore says is an aphrodisiac. No food is actually scientifically linked to desire, but here's how some got that rep.
NPR

A Reopened Embassy In Havana Could Be A Boon For U.S. Businesses

When the U.S. reopens its embassy in Havana, it will increase its staff. That should mean more help for American businesses hoping to gain a foothold on the Communist island.
NPR

In A Twist, Tech Companies Are Outsourcing Computer Work To ... Humans

A new trend is sweeping the tech world: hiring real people. NPR's Arun Rath talks to Wired reporter Julia Greenberg about why tech giants are learning to trust human instinct instead of algorithms.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.