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Arlington May Get First All-Electric Taxi Company

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The Arlington County Board is expected to decide today whether the county will approve the nation's first all-electric taxi fleet, according to the Associated Press.

The board is expected to vote after putting off a decision on the proposal from Electric Vehicle Taxicab Co. The company wants to launch a fleet of 40 electric cars with WiFi-enabled tablet computers so riders can browse the web and pay with credit cards during their trip. 

The Arlington Transportation Committee previously voted against bringing the all-electric fleet to the county because members had concerns over how long the batteries would last during peak hours and long trips, the AP reports. The board member said the electric cabs would increase the chances of stranded passengers. The range of the Nissan vehicles in the proposed fleet is rated at 75-120 miles on a full charge.

The county's staff is urging the board to approve the fleet, saying the battery technology is adequate. The cab company, meanwhile, is offering to install pay charging stations around the county.


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