WAMU 88.5 : Morning Edition

Filed Under:

Barry's Bill On Ex-Offender Hiring Fails At D.C. Council

Council chair Mendelson used procedural rules to prevent vote

Play associated audio
D.C. Council member Marion Barry failed Tuesday in his most recent attempt to pass anti-discrimination legislation against ex-offenders.
Mallory Noe-Payne
D.C. Council member Marion Barry failed Tuesday in his most recent attempt to pass anti-discrimination legislation against ex-offenders.

A proposal by D.C. Council member Marion Barry to provide anti-discrimination protections for ex-offenders when they are applying for jobs fell short at the D.C. Council Tuesday. The bill would prohibit employers from asking about an applicant's criminal record until a job offer has been made.

Barry's bill, which has been on the council's agenda for years, never came to a vote Tuesday because Council Chairman Phil Mendelson ruled that Barry had been out of order in his handling of a committee vote on the bill last Thursday that paved the way for the measure to come to the full council.

Barry compared his bill to past legislative efforts to combat discrimination: women's suffrage, the civil rights movement, protections for migrant workers. 

Under the proposed legislation, a job offer offer could only be rescinded based on a criminal record if the potential employee's convictions posed a problem for that specific occupation. Applicants denied a job could appeal to the city's Office of Human Rights, the agency that handles discrimination cases for protected classes. 

Many in the business community were worried the bill would tie up companies in litigation. 

Barry repeatedly clashed with Mendelson during the council debate Tuesday over the bill. Later on Twitter, Barry wrote: "Are you happy Phil, you were successful in your quest to defeat anti-discrimination against the last and the least in their efforts to work." 

NPR

O'Keeffe Museum Acquires Rarely-Seen Work By The Famed Artist

An atmospheric image of barns in Lake George, N.Y., is joining the collection at the Georgia O'Keeffe Museum in Santa Fe, N.M. The painting reveals a lesser-known genre of the artist's work.
NPR

We Don't Know How Many Workers Are Injured At Slaughterhouses. Here's Why

Injuries in the meat industry are likely to be under-reported, a new GAO report finds. Workers may be sent back to the line without seeing a doctor, or may not report out of fear of losing their jobs.
WAMU 88.5

Power Plant Fight In Prince George's County

A predominantly African American community in rural Prince George's County recently filed a federal civil rights complaint in response to plans to build a third power plant in one town, and fifth in the region.

NPR

Reports Peg Tech Billionaire As Funder Of Hulk Hogan's Case Against Gawker

The New York Times says entrepreneur Peter Thiel confirms he has been bankrolling the ex-wrestler's lawsuit. Gawker is appealing a jury award to Hogan of $140 million over publication of a sex tape.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.