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Metro Seeks Input On Reduced Service For W6, W8 Bus Lines

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Metro is considering curtailing bus service in one of the most economically challenged areas of the District 

The W6 and W8 bus routes take riders from Anacostia metro station through all of Southeast D.C. It's one of the only reliable methods of mass transportation in this part of the District late at night.

But wants to cut back late night service on these lines. The W6 and W8 buses are routinely pelted by rocks, bottles, bricks and other items, and this has led to damaged buses and injured drivers and riders, the transit agency says.

The changes to the W6 and W8 lines are among a slew of Metrobus changes the agency is proposing. The deadline for public comments to be submitted in writing for all of those changes was this morning at 9 a.m.

A public hearing on the W6 and W8 changes is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. at the Angels of Hope Ministries on Evans Road SE. District officials want to hear from the public about how this change might affect them. Metro Transit police an D.C. police have differed on the severity of the problem. 

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