Cases Of TB, Other Rare Diseases Rise In Montgomery County | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : Morning Edition

Filed Under:

Cases Of TB, Other Rare Diseases Rise In Montgomery County

Play associated audio

Montgomery County is seeing an increase in three rare diseases: pertussis, legionella and turberculosis.

Cases of all three ailments are on the rise, although there are still well under 100 likely cases of each in a county with a population nearing 1 million. But it is still an alarm for public health officials. 

The increase in tuberculosis is most concerning to Dr. Ulder Tillman, the county's chief health officer, as she told the county council during a briefing Tuesday. The rise comes as cases of the disease are falling statewide, she said. 

Tillman attributed the increase to the growing immigrant population in the county, which in turn makes tuberculosis prevention efforts very difficult.

"We're doing our best, but it's really the nature of our community, our demographic makeup, where people come from," she said. "They are bringing it with them. And it's something we need to look for."

Since disease prevention isn't likely to work in this particular case, Tillman feels the county would be better off raising awareness about tuberculosis within the immigrant population and making treatment of it easy to get.

NPR

Book Review: 'Angels Make Their Hope Here'

Alan Cheuse reviews Angels Make Their Hope Here, by Breena Clarke.
NPR

Fruit Recall Hits Trader Joe's, Costco, Wal-Mart Stores

The recall applies to "certain lots of whole peaches (white and yellow), nectarines (white and yellow), plums and pluots" from a California packing company, the FDA says.
NPR

On Immigration, America's Concerns Are Fiery But Fleeting

In a recent Gallup poll, most named immigration the biggest problem confronting the nation. But past periods of heightened worries have been brief — and haven't brought about solutions.
NPR

9/11 Commission Issues An Update On Anniversary Of Report

Saying that the world has changed "dramatically," the report's authors write that al-Qaida groups have spread, and the threat for cyberterrorism has grown.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.