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Thanksgiving At Fillmore: Silver Spring Venue Gives Back

A sign welcomes one and all to the Fillmore's Thanksgiving celebration.
Matt Laslo
A sign welcomes one and all to the Fillmore's Thanksgiving celebration.

Homeless and needy families in Silver Spring, Md. are being treated to a special meal today at an unconventional venue. 

Outside the Fillmore — a new concert hall that opened last year — are posters for acts like The Roots and Flogging Molly. It's not exactly something one connects with Thanksgiving. But it's a different scene than usual today.

Dozens of volunteers, including council members and County Executive Ike Leggett, spent the morning and early afternoon dishing out heaping plates of Turkey, stuffing and of course the holiday staple: pumpkin pie. Live bands played in the background.

Fillmore general manager Stephanie Steele said it's a way to connect with the community.

"The Fillmore Silver Spring is all about bringing music to the people of this area," Steele said. "And Thanksgiving represented a great opportunity for us to bring not only music but friendship and assistance to those who are in need."

Volunteers also packed gift bags for the guests, which included items like tooth brushes, socks and healthy snacks. 

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