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Former D.C. Council Member Used Position To Void Traffic Tickets

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A D.C. parking ticket that has been discarded in the grass.
Wayan Vota: http://www.flickr.com/photos/dcmetroblogger/2857625215/
A D.C. parking ticket that has been discarded in the grass.

City officials are investigating how a former D.C. Council member used his office last year to get out of a traffic ticket.

The report, from the office of the D.C. Inspector General, doesn't name the politician, although it refers to the lawmaker as "then-D.C. Council member," leaving a smaller pool to pick from. Only two D.C. Council members have left the council since January: Kwame Brown and Harry Thomas Jr.

The council member's chief of staff emailed DMV Director Lucinda Babers to try to get out of 10 tickets because the parking laws do not apply to D.C. council members, according to the report.

The request was forwarded to a hearing examiner, who dismissed 6 tickets. Four were upheld: a pair of speeding tickets, one red light violation, and one for failure to report inspection. 

About five months later, the inspection fine was somehow dismissed by the Department of Public Works, which is in charge of writing many of the tickets, the investigation found.

The report says the incident highlights the risk in D.C. that individuals can abuse the ticket voiding system. 

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