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House Intelligence Committee To Grill CIA Official On Benghazi

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All week long, the buzz on Capitol Hill has swirled around David Petraeus, the Central Intelligence Agency and events in Libya. Lawmakers finally get to pepper administration officials with their lingering questions in a hearing today.

Lawmakers in both parties say the Obama Administration has some explaining to do. Capitol Hill has been brimming with confusion and speculation since David Petraeus abruptly stepped down as the head of the CIA after the Federal Bureau of Investigation uncovered an affair he had with his biographer. Answers may come today when acting director of the CIA Michael Morell holds closed-door hearings. 

Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger (D-Md.), the top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, was already briefed, but has lingering questions. 

"I'm not frustrated. I'm frustrated when I don't have the facts and I don't have all the facts. I have more facts today than I did yesterday," he says. "But I'm not frustrated until we do our due diligence, and our procedures and process are to have hearings and get information and then we will make conclusions." 

The hearings are supposed to center on the administration's response to the slaying of four Americans in Benghazi, but it likely won't end there.

"First it's going to be on Libya and I'm sure the issue of Petraeus and the CIA will come before the committee members," Ruppersberger says.

The House Intelligence Committee didn't ask Petraeus to testify today.

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