WAMU 88.5 : Morning Edition

Filed Under:

Maryland Gay Marriage Supporters Party Into The Night

Play associated audio

The party went into the early hours in Baltimore after Maryland voters upheld same-sex marriage via referendum.

No state had ever approved same-sex marriage via a voter referendum. But within minutes, both Maine and Maryland did so. Since Maryland's polls closed first, supporters here claimed they were the first in the country to do so — and a raucous party ensued. 

Richard Madaleno, the only openly gay senator in the Maryland Senate, was confident even though the final tally was close.

"The fair minded people in Maryland that live in the state of Maryland, I knew we would be first," he said. "I knew people would understand our call for fairness and equality. I never doubted that we would win and would be the first state to win."

Madaleno got a huge cheer when he asked his partner to "marry him again" from the stage, but the loudest ovation of the night went to governor Martin O'Malley.

"In our state, because we're good people, because we understand the importance of diversity and religious freedom, and that we're in this together," O'Malley said. "It does not surprise me that Maryland would be the first state to pass this."

Revelers stayed, dancing and celebrating, well after the big names spoke and left the building.

NPR

Not My Job: Sharon Jones Gets Quizzed On Handshakes

We've invited the lead singer of Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings to play a game called "Let's shake on it."
NPR

Salvage Supperclub: A High-End Dinner In A Dumpster To Fight Food Waste

The ingredients — think wilted basil, bruised plums, garbanzo bean water — sound less than appetizing. Whipped together, they're a tasty meal that show how home cooks can use often-tossed foods.
NPR

5 Takeaways From The Democratic National Convention

As conventioneers head home after a dramatic DNC, here are 5 takeaways from Philadelphia.
NPR

How Your Health Data Lead A Not-So-Secret Life Online

Apps can make managing health care a lot easier, but most don't have the privacy protections required of doctors and hospitals. And a simple Web search can clue in advertisers to health concerns.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.