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Maryland Gay Marriage Supporters Party Into The Night

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The party went into the early hours in Baltimore after Maryland voters upheld same-sex marriage via referendum.

No state had ever approved same-sex marriage via a voter referendum. But within minutes, both Maine and Maryland did so. Since Maryland's polls closed first, supporters here claimed they were the first in the country to do so — and a raucous party ensued. 

Richard Madaleno, the only openly gay senator in the Maryland Senate, was confident even though the final tally was close.

"The fair minded people in Maryland that live in the state of Maryland, I knew we would be first," he said. "I knew people would understand our call for fairness and equality. I never doubted that we would win and would be the first state to win."

Madaleno got a huge cheer when he asked his partner to "marry him again" from the stage, but the loudest ovation of the night went to governor Martin O'Malley.

"In our state, because we're good people, because we understand the importance of diversity and religious freedom, and that we're in this together," O'Malley said. "It does not surprise me that Maryland would be the first state to pass this."

Revelers stayed, dancing and celebrating, well after the big names spoke and left the building.


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