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Virginia's Kaine, Allen Spent Most On U.S. Senate Race

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As Virginia voters head to the polls today, a lot of national media attention is being paid to who the state decides to send to the White House. But voters are also deciding one of the closest Senate races in the nation. 

The numbers are staggering. Nearly $80 million was spent to win Virginia's open Senate seat. That wins the commonwealth the dubious title of being the most expensive Senate battle waged this year. 

It attracted so much money, in part, because the race pits two well-known former governors against each other, Democrat Tim Kaine and Republican George Allen. The contest also attracted heavy spending because the state is truly purple. For months, polls showed no leader and then Kaine inched ever so slightly ahead, but analysts still expect the race to go down to the wire today. 

To get their message out, both Senate candidates have latched on to their party's presidential candidate in the final days of this election, grasping for any edge. 

Now the speeches are over and both campaigns are working aggressively to drive their supporters to the polls today. 

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