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Parkmobile: Fee Hike Isn't Fault Of Durbin Amendment

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Parkmobile parking system is apologizing for blaming an increase in fees on a new federal law bearing Illinois Sen. Richard Durbin's name. 
 
Rebecca Cooper
  Parkmobile parking system is apologizing for blaming an increase in fees on a new federal law bearing Illinois Sen. Richard Durbin's name.   

Parkmobile, the pay-by-phone parking contractor in Washington, is apologizing after it blamed a recent fee hike on federal financial regulations.

Parkmobile sent an email to customers recently saying fees would rise from 32 cents to 45 cents on each parking session starting Oct. 29. It said the costs were triggered by federal legislation "enacted by the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act's Durbin Amendment."

That didn't sit well with Illinois Sen. Richard Durbin. He wrote a letter to Parkmobile, saying the company's assertion was "grossly misleading." He wrote that Visa and MasterCard raised fees and that his legislation capped such fees.

Parkmobile then apologized in a message to customers. Durbin also wrote to Washington Mayor Vincent Gray saying the city's parking contractor was putting out incorrect information.

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