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Hurricane Sandy Takes Toll On Campaigns In Virginia

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Most politicking in the battleground state of Virginia has been on hold this week because of Hurricane Sandy. With less than a week before elections, the storm threw a wrench in both presidential candidates' plans to energize voters in Virginia; they had to scrap rallies in the state due to the storm. 

Both campaigns could suffer from the cancellations, says Larry Sabato, Director of the University of Virginia's Center for Politics. 

"The great thing about personal appearances by candidates at big rallies is it really charges up your party base," Sabato says.

As for who benefits politically from the devastating storm, President Obama will,  Sabato says, if the restoration goes as planned.

"The more he looks and acts like the president, which is his day job, the more benefit he derives from this and, of course, he also sidelines Governor Romney," Sabato says. "It's very difficult for Romney to be anything other than a bystander. He has no public office. His day and night job is just to be a candidate." 

Hoping not to lose ground in Virginia, Mitt Romney is scheduling three rallies in the state on Thursday. 

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