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Hurricane Sandy Debris Pickup Guide

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Yard waste from Hurricane Sandy must be cut into smaller pieces for most counties in the area to pick it up.
Armando Trull
Yard waste from Hurricane Sandy must be cut into smaller pieces for most counties in the area to pick it up.

Residents throughout the area are still picking up debris from Sandy, different counties have different rules about how to dispose of it.

In the District, you have until Monday to put out storm debris.

"What we would like people to do is break up the limbs and branches into about 4 foot lengths, put them at the front of their homes at the curb," says Linda Grant is with the Department of Public Works. "And they can definitely be bundled. That will help speed up the collection process."

All of the counties around D.C. have slightly different rules about what you can put out, but heres's what you can do to satisfy all of them:  Put your debris in bundles. Make sure everything is less than 4 feet long, and weighs less than 40 pounds.

In Prince George's County, residents need to make sure there are no limbs thicker than 3 inches; elsewhere they'll pick up thicker branches. Arlington has waived size requirements, for example. Here's a rundown of what some area jurisdictions are doing: 

  • Arlington County: Go to arlingtonva.us or call 703-228-6570 to request a pickup; county is waiving the size requirements.
  • Fairfax County: Bundles of less than 4 feet long and less than 50 lbs, no piece larger than 6 inches in diameter. 
  • Prince George's County: Not to exceed 4 feet in length and 3 inches in diameter, must be securely tied in bundles.
  • Montgomery County: No more than 4 feet in length and 4 inches in diameter, bags or bundles less than 45 lbs and 30 inches; debris will be collected on a resident's regular recycling day. Tree debris (up to 500 pounds) that is too large for curbside collection, or cannot be bagged, bundled, or placed in containers can be recycled at no charge to single family home residents at the Shady Grove Processing Facility and Transfer Station, on Wednesday.
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