Maryland Boy Accused Of Murder Sentenced To Therapeutic Home | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Maryland Boy Accused Of Murder Sentenced To Therapeutic Home

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A 13-year-old Prince George's County boy has received his punishment in the death of a foster child living with his family, according to the Associated Press.

The boy has been ordered to serve an indefinite amount of time in a therapeutic home after entering an "Alford plea" in the death of his 2-year-old foster sister, prosecutors say. In an Alford plea, the suspect doesn't admit wrongdoing, but acknowledges prosecutors have enough evidence to convict.

The boy's father called 911 last July, reporting his foster child was unresponsive, according to police. The father also performed CPR on the 2-year-old child, but she was pronounced dead at a hospital. 

The boy, who was 12 years old at the time, admitted he hit the girl six times. An autopsy determined the cause of death was blunt force trauma, but also revealed more than 50 internal and external injuries.

The judge stated that she believes the boy doesn't fully grasp what he did, and specifically ordered him placed in a home with no one under the age of 18, according to state's attorney Angela Alsobrooks.

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