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Virginia Polling Places May See International Vote Monitors

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Voters casting ballots in Virginia this November may have their polling place checked by international elections monitors.
Nate Shepard: http://www.flickr.com/photos/nshepard/295899135/
Voters casting ballots in Virginia this November may have their polling place checked by international elections monitors.

Virginia election officials may have some foreign monitors looking over their shoulders on Election Day. 

The United States is supposed to be the global standard bearer on administering elections, but this year the shoe is on the other foot. After numerous states implemented what critics say are restrictive voter laws, vote monitors from Europe and Asia are being sent to the U.S. to keep an eye on this year's election. They'll be looking for efforts to suppress votes. 

The Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, which partners with the United Nations on human rights issues, is sending 44 observers to the states this November and some could end up in Virginia. 

The commonwealth passed a law requiring voters to bring identification to the polls, although, unlike some other states with new voter ID law, they'll also accept non-photo IDs. 

But some conservatives are upset other nations want to monitor U.S. elections. Catherine Engelbrecht of the right-leaning True the Vote told The Hill newspaper, "The United Nations has no jurisdiction over American elections." 

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