Baltimore Resident To File Class Action Lawsuit Over Water Bills | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Baltimore Resident To File Class Action Lawsuit Over Water Bills

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A circuit court clerk in Maryland plans to file a class-action lawsuit against the city of Baltimore on behalf of residents who were overcharged by the city's water system, according to the Baltimore Sun.

Baltimore City officials have acknowledged overcharging 38,000 customers for water service. Circuit Court Clerk Frank Conaway is seeking monetary damages for the affected residents, some of whom were forced from their homes because of the bills.

Conaway and his attorney say the suit is being filed because the city failed to collect water bills owed by businesses and nonprofit organizations, even as residents were taken advantage of and losing their homes. 

In response, the city's solicitor, George Nilson, is accusing Conaway and others of filing the lawsuits in an effort to get publicity. Conaway, who ran against Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake in the last election, says his political opposition is unrelated. 

City officials say they have issued refunds for the erroneous bills.

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