D.C. Council Considers Lowering Speed Camera Ticket Fines | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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D.C. Council Considers Lowering Speed Camera Ticket Fines

Fines for tickets issued from traffic cameras, like this one on Wisconsin Avenue NW, would go down under new legislation being considered by the D.C. Council.
Brendan Sweeney
Fines for tickets issued from traffic cameras, like this one on Wisconsin Avenue NW, would go down under new legislation being considered by the D.C. Council.

New legislation being considered by the D.C. Council would reduce fines from automated speed cameras and red light cameras, according to the Associated Press.

Council members Tommy Wells, Mary Cheh and Marion Barry introduced legislation Tuesday that would overhaul the automated traffic enforcement program. The system has been expanded to bring $60 million annually into city coffers. 

Current fines run $150 for driving up to 20 mph over the speed limit and $100 for a red light infraction. Those fines could be reduced to $50 under the new law. The bill would give violators a 30-day warning period before fines are assessed from a new camera.

D.C. drivers are convinced automated cameras are mostly about raising revenue, Wells says, adding that the perception must change as police prepare to expand the number of cameras. 

Pedro Ribeiro, a spokesman for Mayor Vincent Gray, told the Associated Press there's concern the changes don't protect public safety.

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