D.C. Won't Renew Contract With Thompson's Company | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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D.C. Won't Renew Contract With Thompson's Company

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The health care company owned by Jeffrey Thompson, the millionaire fundraiser linked to Mayor Vincent Gray's shadow campaign, may not be able to continue doing business with the District, the Washington Post reports. 

Chartered Health Plan, which is owned by Thompson, will not have its $355 million contract renewed after 2013, Districts officials — who asked for anonymity — told the Post. An audit of the company's finances found major problems. 

The company manages health care for approximately 100,000 low-income D.C. residents, according to the Post.

Thompson's home and offices were raided by the FBI early this year as part of the federal investigation into District corruption. Soon thereafter, Thompson resigned as the company's chairman. 

Chartered Health plan officials will hold a board meeting tonight that will be attended by government regulators. Among the issues on the table, the Post reports, is placing one of the largest contractors in the District under government receivership. 

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