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ATM Repair Man Stole Money From ATMs He Was Supposed To Fix

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Broken ATMs were a target of a West Virginia based technician, who has pleaded guilty to stealing almost $113,000 from the machines.
Jonathan Wilson
Broken ATMs were a target of a West Virginia based technician, who has pleaded guilty to stealing almost $113,000 from the machines.

A man tasked with servicing automatic teller machines in Maryland has been sentenced on charges of stealing from those ATMs, according to the Associate Press.

John Nathaniel Watts, 34, of Martinsburg, W.V. was working as an ATM technician in 2011. Instead of servicing the ATM at Sun Trust Bank branch in Bowie, Md., he opened it up and took more than $66,000 in cash. He put the money in his tool bag and left the bank, according to his guilty plea. 

Watts confessed to similar thefts from bank machines in other locations in Maryland before he was caught. In all, he stole nearly $113,000. 

He was sentenced to four months in prison, with another eight months of home confinement after that, and ordered to pay restitution to those he stole from. 

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