DCPS Selects Teacher, Principal Of The Year | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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DCPS Selects Teacher, Principal Of The Year

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D.C. Public Schools officials have named David Pinder principal of the year and Hope Harrod teacher of the year. 

Pinder began his career as a social studies teacher and now heads McKinley Technology High School in Northeast D.C. It's a specialized high school where approximately 700 students focus on science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). 

Pinder received the award, in part, because under his leadership, McKinley students have made significant progress in test scores, says DCPS chancellor Kaya Henderson. They have increased average test scores by more than 30 percentage points in math and 20 percentage points in reading.  

Harrod is a 5th grade teacher at Burroughs Education Campus in Northeast, which is also a STEM school. Colleagues nominated Harrod saying she "transforms" her students' lives. On this year's standardized tests, her students made large gains in reading and math. 

Harrod also mentors other teachers, coordinates school book fairs and organizes mathematics labs for students after school. 

Both will receive $10,000. That's separate from bonus money of up to $25,000 they may receive under the district's teacher evaluation system. 

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