WAMU 88.5 : Morning Edition

Filed Under:

Nats Fizzle In First Home Playoff Game In 79 Years

Play associated audio
Standing-room tickets were all that was available the day of the Nats playoff game, and the attendance was record-breaking.
Markette Smith
Standing-room tickets were all that was available the day of the Nats playoff game, and the attendance was record-breaking.

The Washington Nationals literally rolled out the red carpet for their first home game of the postseason. The red carpet during roll call is usually only reserved for the first game of the season, but since this is such a historic event, the first postseason home game in 79 years, the Nats pulled out all the stops.

Unfortunately, the same can't be said of the team, who were shut out 8-0 by the Cardinals. Starter Edwin Jackson gave up 4 runs on 8 hits and a walk over 5 innings, prompting early and frequent calls on Twitter for young pitching phenom Stephen Strasburg to take over.

Fans started arriving as early as 9 a.m. to make sure they don't miss the excitement of the first home game of the playoffs. The mood was festive before the game and there was a sea of red packing Metro trains pulling into the stadium in the largest crowd at Nationals Stadium since it opened in 2005.

As one ticket holder put it: "This is so exciting, I can't stop smiling."

There was also a flyover by the 113th wing of the Air National Guard, after which fans erupted in a cheer of "Let's Go Nats!" The first pitch was thrown by former MVP and triple crown winner Frank Robinson, who was also the first manager of the Nationals in 2005.

The game ended just before 5 p.m. in the evening, unleashing the record Nationals Stadium crowd right into the middle of a rush hour crush on the Green Line.

Hopeful fans still have a chance of attending Thursday's game, which starts at 4 p.m.; the box office will sell a limited number of standing-room-only tickets Thursday morning.

NPR

Texas Bookseller Picks 3 Summer Reads

Julia Green of Front Street Books recommends Moonlight on Linoleum by Terry Helwig, City of Women by David R. Gillham and The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate by Jacqueline Kelly.
NPR

He Used To Live On The Streets Of Mumbai. Now, His Cafe Welcomes Everyone

Amin Sheikh's new cafe is a rarity in class-stratified India: It's open to people from all walks of life. Sheikh is a former street child, and so are many of his employees.
NPR

For Many Black Voters, Trump's 'What Do You Have To Lose?' Plea Isn't Enough

Donald Trump promises to help bring jobs and security to black neighborhoods. But his poll numbers with African-Americans are in the low single digits, and many say his message is insulting.
WAMU 88.5

A Cyber-Psychologist Explains How Human Behavior Changes Online

Dr. Mary Aiken, a pioneering cyber-psychologist, work inspired the CBS television series "CSI: Cyber". She explains how going online changes our behavior in small and dramatic ways, and what that means for how we think about our relationship with technology.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.