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Nationals Beat St. Louis Cardinals In Game One


Washington Nationals' Tyler Moore celebrates in the dugout after hitting a two-RBI single during the eighth inning of Game 1 of the National League division baseball series against the St. Louis Cardinals.
(AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)
Washington Nationals' Tyler Moore celebrates in the dugout after hitting a two-RBI single during the eighth inning of Game 1 of the National League division baseball series against the St. Louis Cardinals.

The Washington Nationals won a tense game one in the National League Division series yesterday, coming from behind to beat the St. Louis Cardinals 3-2. Tyler Moore drove in the tying and go-ahead runs with a two-out two-strike single in the top of the eighth inning. 

Nats closer Drew Storen got the save, finishing off the Cardinals in the bottom of the ninth. The Nats' starting pitcher, Gio Gonzales, allowed one hit but walked seven batters.

Nats now lead the best of five series one game to none. Game two is this afternoon in St. Louis.

Later in the night, the Baltimore Orioles lost their playoff series opener, falling to the New York Yankees 7-2 in a game that was delayed by rain for more than two hours. Game two in that series is tonight in Baltimore.

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