WAMU 88.5 : Morning Edition

Filed Under:

Gas Prices Expected To Stay High Through Election

Play associated audio
Gas prices aren't expected to take their usual campaign dive this year, AAA Mid-Atlantic reports.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/demond_henderson/5141909986
Gas prices aren't expected to take their usual campaign dive this year, AAA Mid-Atlantic reports.

Historically, gas prices drop in the weeks before a presidential election. But drivers suffering record-high gas prices in the D.C. may not get a break this campaign season.

In 2008, the price of gas was $4.11 per gallon in July, but by Election Day, it had fallen to a little under $2 per gallon. Although that was a particularly big drop, that's what gas prices have done for decades, until now, according to AAA  Mid-Atlantic.

"We've never seen gas prices this radioactive in any national election year  going back to since we've been keeping records, and that goes back to the 1980s," says John Townsend of AAA.

In fact, the price of gas has been rising every day for the past five weeks, with the average price of a gallon of gas nationally now at $3.78, according to AAA. Fuel in Maryland averages $3.71 per gallon, and Virginia's gas costs $3.61 on average. The District has and the highest prices in the area with an average of $3.90 per gallon. 

NPR

'End Of The Tour': An Unauthorized 'Anti-Biopic' Of David Foster Wallace

Instead of telling the author's life story, the film (which the Wallace estate does not approve of) focuses on five days in 1996 during the publicity tour for Infinite Jest.
NPR

Humans Aren't The Only Ones To Go Ape Over Diets: Chimps Detox, Too

A group of Ugandan chimps has found a great way to boost their mineral intake and neutralize bitter compounds in their diet: by eating clay.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour - July 31, 2015

Join us for our weekly review of the politics, policies, and personalities of the District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia.

NPR

In Michigan, A Testing Ground For A Future Of Driverless Cars

Automakers and researchers are using a 32-acre fake city at the University of Michigan to simulate a real-world environment for autonomous vehicles. How will such cars affect urban planning?

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.