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Authorities Investigate String Of Robberies In House Offices

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One more theft is being reported in a disturbing string of break-ins at U.S. House Office Buildings on Capitol Hill. Since the spring, five U.S. House members have reported burglaries in their Capitol Hill offices. 

Rep. Mike McIntyre (D-N.C.) is the latest lawmaker to have pricey items snatched, according to National Journal. His office says it lost two bottles of Scotch, a few presidential Easter eggs and $1,000 worth of cuff links, among other items. 

U.S. Capitol Police is looking into the alleged crimes, according to spokeswoman Lieutenant Kimberly Schneider. 

"For any recent thefts that have been reported to the Capitol Police we continue to have an active, open investigation and we're working diligently to solve those cases," she says. 

McIntyre is the first Democrat to report a theft this year. The burglary at his office is the third reported in the Rayburn House Office Building, while two other lawmakers' offices in the Longworth building are missing electronic equipment. 

The spree began in April and seems to be contained to the House side of the Capitol complex. 

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