Loudoun Supervisor Accused Of Using County Staff For Campaign | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Loudoun Supervisor Accused Of Using County Staff For Campaign

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A Loudoun County supervisor known for his opposition to gay rights has been accused of improperly directing his county staff to solicit campaign contributions, according to the Washington Post.

Donna Mateer, a former part-time staffer in Republican Supervisor Eugene Delgaudio's county office, spent most of her time calling potential campaign donors, she told the Post.

Delgaudio says he did nothing wrong and was soliciting donations for a youth football league. But several of the would-be donors who were solicited told the Post Delgaudio was seeking campaign contributions. 

Mateer told the newspaper she has been interviewed by the FBI about Delgaudio's fundraising tactics. The FBI declined comment. 

Delgaudio is also president of Public Advocate, which the Southern Poverty Law Center recently labeled a hate group for its anti-gay views. Public Advocate is being sued by a gay couple from New Jersey who claim that Delgaudio's group illegally used their engagement photo in in anti-gay marriage mailers sent to Colorado voters. 

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