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Sen. Paul Holds Up Federal Funding Bill

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There's some wrangling going on in the U.S. Senate this week over a short-term bill to keep the government's lights on and the gridlock could keep the Senate in town over the weekend. 

Before senators can get back on the campaign trail, they have to fund the government. So many lawmakers are frustrated that Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) is demanding a vote on his proposal to cut off foreign aid to Pakistan, Egypt and Libya until their governments prove they're working with U.S. officials. 

But some lawmakers, including Maryland Sen. Ben Cardin (D), don't think Paul should tie his foreign aid proposal to a bill designed to keep the government funded at last year's levels. 

"We should clearly be willing to debate all parts of appropriation bills, but it shouldn't be on the Continuing Resolution, which by its definition continues current policies until Congress can take up the full appropriation issues," Cardin says.

The bill to keep the government funded passed a procedural hurdle on Wednesday. Once it clears the Senate, lawmakers aren't expected to be back in Washington until after Election Day. 

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