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Maryland Lawmakers Want Supreme Court Review Of DNA Case

The Maryland Court of Appeals ruling that overturned a law allowing police to collect DNA samples from people charged with violent crimes and burglaries is coming under fire, according to the Associated Press.

The law allowing the DNA collection from violent criminals was struck down by the appellate court in April. A bipartisan group of 19 Maryland state lawmakers filed a legal brief Monday urging the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn the ruling, the Baltimore Sun reports. Maryland Attorney General Doug Gansler is also petitioning for the Court's review. 

The law, which is set to expire at the end of next year, is getting a boost. The lawmakers — 12 Democrats and seven Republicans — also support extending the law. Supporters argue the practice can help resolve previously unsolved crime cases, like that of Alonzo King Jr., who was arrested for assault in 2009 and his DNA was later tied to a 2003 rape. 

Civil liberties groups who oppose the law argue that it violates the principle that upon arrest, people are presumed innocent until proven guilty, the Sun reports.

Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts has indicated the high court probably will consider and may reverse the ruling.

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