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Clergy, Worshippers Come Together For 9/11 Unity Walk

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Hundreds of people from various religions spent their Sunday visiting houses of worship in the District during the 8th Annual 9/11 Unity Walk.

The Unity Walk started at Washington Hebrew Congregation with a prayer and a taped message from Archbishop Desmond Tutu. Christian, Muslim and Buddhist temples all opened their doors to the public in a show of solidarity as they remember the attacks of Sept. 11, 2011.

Reverend Doctor Maynard Moore, a Methodist, set up prayer mats near the hebrew congregation's outdoor fountain to welcome those of the Muslim faith.

"We celebrate our unity and diversity with water," he said. 

In all, 13 different houses of worship participated in the prayer walk along Massachusetts Avenue NW and Embassy Row. The public was invited to enter their doors, break bread, listen to music and hear prayers of peace from various denominations.

"It's a time for meditation and reflection," says 9/11 Unity Walk executive director Cara Rockhill, who organized this year's stroll.

"Catastrophic events provide two options. They either drive people apart or bring them together and everybody here has chosen the more difficult path," she said. "They've chosen to come together." 

The peaceful program concluded with remarks from the grandson of Mahatma Ghandi at the Mahatma Gandhi memorial. 


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