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Mikulski To Honor Women In The Senate At DNC

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Sen. Barbara Mikulski (D-Md.) answers questions at a town hall meeting in Greenbelt, Md. in November, 2011.
Courtesy of NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center/Bill Hrybyk
Sen. Barbara Mikulski (D-Md.) answers questions at a town hall meeting in Greenbelt, Md. in November, 2011.

Democrats are expected to highlight prominent women in the party at their National Convention in Charlotte this week, and Maryland Sen. Barbara Mikulski will lead a program recognizing her women colleagues in the Senate.

There are 12 Democratic women in the U.S. Senate, but Mikulski's hoping more will join the ranks. She'll appear on stage with several of her colleagues this week to highlight their work on jobs, health care and higher education.

"We're going to show that we women, we Democratic women in the Senate, focus on the big macro issues, but we also focus on the macaroni and cheese issues — those things that affect families," Mikulski said during an interview on WAMU's All Things Considered Monday.

Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley and Maryland Reps. Donna Edwards and Chris Van Hollen will speak at the convention this week as well. Former Virginia Gov. Tim Kaine, who's currently running for U.S. Senate, will also address the crowd in Charlotte tonight.

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