DNC 2012: Virginia Takes Prime Floor Spot, Just Like At RNC | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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DNC 2012: Virginia Takes Prime Floor Spot, Just Like At RNC

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The region's delegates to the Democratic National Convention are in Charlotte and the Virginia delegation is being pampered because the state is so key to this election.

Every detail of the convention has been crafted to portray the party's message: "Americans Coming Together." On the convention floor, it's obvious which states are in play this year just by looking at where the delegations are seated. Virginia is surely at the top of the list. 

The commonwealth's delegates get one of the better views of the stage because they're one of just a handful of states with floor seating. As for delegates from Maryland and the District, they're tucked away in the furthest corner of the hall. 

But even delegates with poor seats are going to be a part of history, says Steve Kerrigan, the CEO of the convention. 

"We have the largest delegation in the history of conventions," he says. "Almost 6,000 people of all different cross sections of our country and the most diverse grassroots delegation."

Events kick-off later today with First Lady Michelle Obama making the evening's most prominent speech. 

 

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