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Maryland Legislator Admits To Drinking Before Boat Collision

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A Maryland lawmaker admitted that he was drinking before operating a motorboat that collided with another vessel, injuring him and five others.

Delegate Don Dwyer said at a news conference Thursday afternoon at Shock Trauma in Baltimore that he regretted his actions, saying no one should ever drink and operate a motor vehicle or powerboat. He reportedly had a blood alcohol level of .02.

Dwyer did not take questions at the news conference, where he appeared in a wheelchair, with an Ace bandage on his left foot.

Del. Donald Dwyer of Pasadena was taken to Maryland Shock Trauma Center for treatment after the accident, where police took a blood sample. He was listed in serious condition late Wednesday night.

Maryland Natural Resources Police say the two motorboats collided about 7 p.m. Wednesday night, causing one to sink. People living nearby used their own boats to help rescue those injured.

A department spokesman says two boys, aged 12 and 7, and a 5-year-old girl were taken to Johns Hopkins Pediatric Trauma Center in serious condition. A 10-year-old boy was taken to the hospital with less serious injuries. Two other adults were also injured. None of the injuries was considered life-threatening on Thursday.

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