WAMU 88.5 : Morning Edition

Filed Under:

Task Force To Look At Bloomingdale, LeDroit Park Flooding

Play associated audio

After a series of devastating floods in two Washington neighborhoods, D.C. lawmakers are scrambling to find answers.

After three thunderstorms in a two-week span last month caused serious flooding in both Bloomingdale and Ledroit Park in Northwest, Mayor Vincent Gray has launched a task-force to study what's causing the flooding and to find out what can be done to stop it.

The long-term fix, says the mayor, will be the Clean Rivers Project, a $2.6 billion project to revamp the city's sewers, tunnels, and waterways. The massive project will allow D.C. to capture and clean water during heavy rainfalls and prevent sewer overflows  but it's not scheduled to be completed until 2025.

"We think the solution will be the Clean Rivers program but we just can t wait that long," Gray says. 

Possible short-term solutions include rebates for backflow preventers, which can help keep sewage from backing up during thunderstorms. The city is also aggressively inspecting and cleaning up sewer lines and catch basins in the area.

The task force will be led by the head of DC Water, George Hawkings, and City Administrator Alan Lew. The group's findings are due by the end of the year.

WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, April 23

You can liven up your step with some funky, reggae music or dance like you’re the only person riding the Metro.

NPR

Fast-Food CEOs Earn Supersize Salaries; Workers Earn Small Potatoes

A new report finds that the average compensation of fast-food CEOs has quadrupled since 2000. By comparison, worker wages have increased less than 1 percent.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Weighs Which Roads To Build

Four proposals are on the table for building a new highway to the west of Dulles International Airport, but some are hoping the McAuliffe administration will reevaluate the need for a highway altogether.

NPR

The Price War Over The Cloud Has High Stakes For The Internet

Amazon, Google, Microsoft and others are competing to be the main landlords of the cloud. Their terms and prices could control who gets to build what on the Internet, and for how much.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.