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Maryland House Committee To Meet Again On Gambling

Final House vote could come today or tomorrow

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Maryland House members could vote on a gambling expansion bill this evening or early tomorrow. 
Matt Bush
Maryland House members could vote on a gambling expansion bill this evening or early tomorrow. 

A Maryland House subcommittee is expected to finish its work today on a bill that would expand gaming in the state, including a license for a casino in Prince George's County.

The State House Ways and Means Subcommittee met Saturday to look at the bill, but did not conclude its work on it, deciding instead to adjourn and meet again today. Several amendments to the measure are expected to be submitted today, and at least some of them are likely to be approved. 

Speaker of the House Mike Busch told reporters over the weekend he expects his chamber will make changes to the bill the Senate approved Friday evening. If the subcommittee okays the bill, then it would move to the full House for a vote, which could take place late this evening or tomorrow. 

In addition to the Prince George's County casino, the bill would allow table games at Maryland casinos, lower the tax rate on some casino operators, and allow casinos to stay open 24 hours a day.

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