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Accident Kills Driver, Injures Police Officer In Alexandria

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An accident on Franconia Road in Alexandria involving a police cruiser and another car left the driver of the other car dead early in the morning of August 13.
Armando Trull
An accident on Franconia Road in Alexandria involving a police cruiser and another car left the driver of the other car dead early in the morning of August 13.

Franconia Road is now partially reopened between Edison Road and Gun Street in Alexandria after an accident resulting in one fatality occurred just after 3 a.m. today. Authorities are still investigating a fatal crash. 

The accident happened when a 2006 Infiniti traveling eastbound veered suddenly into oncoming traffic on Franconia Road, hitting a police cruiser head on. There was a fiery explosion and the driver of the Infiniti was pronounced dead at the scene. 

The police officer suffered minor injuries but is expected to fully recover. 

"The Infiniti caught fire, and the driver, the sole occupant of the Infiniti, was pronounced dead at the scene," says Fairfax County Police spokesperson Don Gotthardt.

The officer was lucky, Gotthardt added. "It was a tremendous impact. It's a testament to the structural integrity of the car," he said.

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