AARP Poll: Older Voters Bemoan Partisan Gridlock In Washington | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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AARP Poll: Older Voters Bemoan Partisan Gridlock In Washington

Medicare, Social Security among biggest concerns

The biggest concerns facing older voters include Social Security, Medicare, and the ability to fund their retirement, according to a new AARP survey. But that survey also showed these voters are worried about the political gridlock in Washington.

While the issue of jobs is very important to voters of ages 50-plus, meaningful discussion of the economy must include Social Security and Medicare, says AARP Executive Vice President Nancy Leamond.

And Greg Strimple with the GS Strategy Group, who conducted the survey, says voters were not only polled on how they feel, but their intensity on each subject.

"When asked about the political gridlock in Washington, 78 percent of the 50+ audience cited that they've been negatively affected by the political gridlock," Strimple says. 

And the concerns of older voters do not appear to be entirely partisan issues. Although Republicans and Democrats have leanings toward their respective candidates, both agree that it is vital to strengthen and reform Medicare. 

When asked about shoring up Social Security, the majority agreed that neither party seems to have the right answer, and compromise in Washington will be needed to fix it.

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