FBI Investigating D.C. Tax Office After Spike In Settlements | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : Morning Edition

Filed Under:

FBI Investigating D.C. Tax Office After Spike In Settlements

Play associated audio

Whistleblowers at one D.C. government office are turning to federal authorities to investigate reduced tax assessments on some commercial properties in the District.

The investigation by the Federal Bureau of Investigation is targeting the D.C. Office of Tax and Revenue, according to the Washington Post. Three sources within that office tell the Post that the feds are probing how 500 commercial properties had their values reduced by more than $2.5 billion. This move saved the owners tens and even hundreds of thousands of dollars in taxes. 

The city lost as much as $46 million in potential tax revenues this year because of the assessments, and the owners of the properties are politcally well connected, according to the Post report. The reduced assessments many times ran counter to tax office staff recommendation. 

Higher-ups at the tax office bypassed reviews and court appeals, through quick settlements. The report says tax officials defended the quick settlements as a way to avoid any litigation costs.

NPR

U.S. Officials Believe North Korea Was Behind Sony Hack

The recent attack on Sony Pictures' computer network that resulted in a flood of confidential data has its origins in North Korea, U.S. intelligence officials say.
NPR

Japan's Butter Shortage Whips Its Cake Makers Into A Frenzy

For the Japanese, Christmastime means sponge cake. But a nationwide butter shortage has lead to mandatory butter rationing, forcing cake bakers to seek out substitutes.
NPR

Satanist And Christian Holiday Displays To Go Up At Michigan Capitol

The situation has brought controversy — and energized Christians who realized that a planned Nativity scene was in danger of being canceled.
NPR

U.S. Officials Believe North Korea Was Behind Sony Hack

The recent attack on Sony Pictures' computer network that resulted in a flood of confidential data has its origins in North Korea, U.S. intelligence officials say.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.