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Congress Leaves For Recess Without 'Cleaning House'

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Lawmakers in the region are frustrated that Congress left town for the month-long August recess without addressing some pressing matters.

Congress has a lot of deadlines confronting it. House and Senate leaders have yet to hammer out a compromise to help farmers whether the severe drought in the Midwest that's expected to drive food prices up nationwide. Lawmakers also need to work out their disagreements on the Bush-era tax cuts which expire at the end of the year.

In addition, hundreds of billions of dollars in cuts are still slated to hit the federal budget unless Congress diverts them. Rep. Jim Moran (D-Va.) believes this is no time for a vacation.

"We're leaving everything, we're just sort of stuffing it all onto a shelf and taking off," he says. "We're leaving a room in complete shambles. You know, the frat boys do that but you'd think the U.S. Congress would want to clean up its room before it left, but that's apparently not going to be the case.

The House also failed to take up a postal service reform bill that passed the Senate before heading out of town. This has already led to the service defaulting on a $5 billion health care payment and it will continue to bleed money with lawmakers gone.

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